Killarney Loop Route – Portage Descriptions

A great resource for trip planning into Killarney Provincial Park is Killarney Outfitters website.  There you will find a description of all the portages in the park. I have listed the descriptions associated with the route I am taking in October.

Killarney Route # 2

PORTAGE FROM GEORGE LAKE TO FREELAND LAKE
This portage is only 80m, but be careful it is a little rocky. On this busy portage, as on all portages,  gear should be moved off to the side before beginning to carry as a courtesy to other paddlers.
Once into Freeland paddle directly to the end of the lake, look on the north shore for the take out spot. Freeland is a shallow lake, and during the summer can be full of aquatic plants such as pickerel weed and water lilies. Twist and turn through the paths in order not to damage this beautiful flora. Also be on the look out for the moose, beaver, muskrat, and herons who feed on these plants. This is a great place to see some wildlife – if quiet.

PORTAGE FROM KILLARNEY LAKE TO FREELAND LAKE
The 380m portage from Killarney to Freeland covers flat to moderate terrain. It begins at a wide shallow landing. This portage follows a small stream through a canopy of mountain maple, birch, and pine. Once at Freeland Lake watch footing as it can sometimes be muddy and wet.

PORTAGE FROM KAKAKISE LAKE TO KILLARNEY LAKE
This 1440m portage begins at a rocky incline and finishes with a steep decline reaching Killarney Lake; it is suggested to tackle it in two trips (gear and then canoe). Along the way, this portage meets with “The Crack” day hike and both follow the same direction for a short distance at the beginning of this trail.

PORTAGE FROM KILLARNEY LAKE TO THREENARROWS LAKE
This two-part portage route covers approximately 3285m in total. The first part is the longest portage in the park at 2950m. However, despite its length this portage is not otherwise difficult as it covers mostly flat ground, except for a steep incline / decline at the end. There are a few sections of the trail that have been eroded by streams so be careful with footing. At the end of this portion is a small unnamed pond. Paddle north to the entrance of the second leg, which should be in sight from the first landing. This second short 335m portage into Threenarrows can be a bit damp at times, so watch footing.

PORTAGE FROM THREENARROWS TO MURIEL LAKE VIAARTIST LAKE
Affectionately dubbed “The Pig”, the first 1320m portion of this route is the steepest portage in the park. The route crosses over Blue Ridge (a section of the La Cloche Mountains), and is very steep on both sides. The trail itself is very rocky so pay attention to footing. Also be sure to have a map close at hand, as the route to Artist Lake intersects with two other trails at three different points. The first is the La Cloche
Silhouette Trail which joins the portage to the right near the beginning of the trail. The second junction is a fork in the trail; this is where the portage to Baie Fine splits off to the west. Bear east for the last 700m to Artist Lake. Due to the strenuousness of this portage, we recommend attempting it in two portions with a rest at the top of Blue Ridge. Upon reachingArtist, paddle east to find the Artist Creek Falls landing for the
next 185m portage. This landing has a steep incline and can be very slippery in wet weather. This route leads into a small unnamed marshy area teeming with small wildlife such as birds, frogs, and even otters. Put in at the smooth sloping granite landing and paddle east for approximately 500m. On the other side there is the final 110m portage to Muriel Lake, this area can be quite wet at times and proper footwear is a must.

PORTAGE FROM MURIEL LAKE TO O.S.A. LAKE
This 595m portage can be found on the northern shore of Muriel Lake’s eastern end. Please watch footing here as a layer of duff covers the bedrock and can create slippery conditions. This portage is particularly scenic as it passes through a hemlock forest.

PORTAGE FROM O.S.A LAKE TO KILLARNEY LAKE
The 455m portage from O.S.A to Killarney Lake begins at a shallow gravel beach and provides good footing. Expect a gradual incline and decline before reaching Killarney. There is an alternate portage, however this route can be difficult to reach due to shallow water levels at times and the portage itself is more strenuous.

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